Chinese Teapots | Ancient Chinese designs & perfect for that special brew

Traditional style teapots with ancient Chinese designs - Calligraphy, floral, plum blossom, ladies, koi fish, lotus flower, dragons, Shou and Feng Yue designs. Teapots and teapot sets with cups. Hand-painted on quality porcelain and carefully glazed. Perfect for that special Chinese tea brew - Buy online - UK stock - Quick delivery

 

Chinese Black Floral Teapot Set
Description Black gloss teapot with flowers and Chinese characters. Includes a metal handle and..
£40.00
Chinese Black Round Teapot Set
Description Black gloss Teapot decorated with a floral motif. Includes a metal handle and four ..
£40.00
Chinese Black Shou Teapot Set
Description Black gloss Teapot with 'Double Happiness' motif. Includes a bamboo handle and two ..
£32.00
Chinese Black Shou Teaset
Description Glossy black teapot set with flowers and longevity motifs. Includes iron handle and..
£30.00
Chinese Chinese Poem Teapot Set
Description Black gloss Teapot decorated with Chinese poem. Includes flexible bamboo handle and..
£40.00
Chinese Double Dragon Tea Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with two white dragons picked out agai..
£36.00
Chinese Garden Games Teaset
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with a colourful scene of ladies at pl..
£36.00
Chinese Good Fortune Teapot Set
Description Glossy black 'Good Fortune' teapot with four cups in presentation box. Including me..
£40.00
Chinese Leaves Teapot Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with a blue trailing leaves design. In..
£36.00
Chinese Matt Black Teapot Set
Description Matt black Teapot with turquoise glaze. Including a bamboo handle and two teacups ..
£36.00
Chinese Matt Black Teapot Set
Description Black matt teapot with turquoise glaze and four cups. Dimensions (l x b x h) ..
£36.00
Chinese Musicians Teapot Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with a colourful scene of musician lad..
£36.00
Chinese Nine Dragon Tea Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with nine flying dragons amid clouds a..
£36.00
Chinese Orange Dragon Teaset
Description Orange glossy Teapot decorated with dragon characters. Includes a metal handle and ..
£40.00
Chinese Orange Gloss Teapot Set
Description Orange gloss teapot decorated with Dragon characters. Includes a metal handle and f..
£40.00
Chinese Palace Garden Teaset
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with a colourful scene of ladies in a ..
£36.00
Chinese Palace Ladies Teapot Set
Description White porcelain traditional Chinese teapot decorated with a colourful scene of ladi..
£36.00
Chinese Pandas Teapot Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with a colourful scene of pandas in a ..
£40.00
Chinese Peony Teapot Set
Description White porcelain traditional teapot decorated with peony flowers and leaves. Include..
£36.00
Chinese Red Gloss Teapot Set
Description Red gloss Teapot decorated with a floral design. Includes a metal handle and four m..
£28.00
Chinese Red Square Cherry Teaset
Description Square red Chinese teapot set decorated with blossom and calligraphy complete with ..
£40.00
Chinese Speckled Plum Teaset
Description Speckled white teapot decorated with blossoms and Chinese characters with four insu..
£40.00
Chinese White Gloss Teapot Set
Description White gloss teapot decorated with dragon characters. Includes a metal handle and fo..
£40.00
Japanese Lady Teaset
Description White Teapot decorated with Japanese ladies. Includes a flexible bamboo handle and ..
£40.00
Round Dragon Teapot Set
Description Speckled teapot with dragon characters with four matching teacups. Dimensions (..
£40.00

Chinese Tea

What is Chinese Tea?

Chinese tea is a beverage made from the leaves of tea plants, their scientific name being Camellia Sinensis, and boiled water. The tea leaves are processed using ancient traditional Chinese methods. Chinese tea is drunk throughout the day, including during meals, as a substitute for plain water. It is considered very healthy and a beverage for simple pleasure.

Chinese TeapotHistory

The practice of tea drinking has a very long history in China and this practice originated there. Although tea drinking classically originated in China during the Tang Dynasty, Chinese tea generally represents tea leaf processing using methods inherited from ancient China. This beverage is considered one of the seven necessities of Chinese culture, as well as firewood, rice, salt. oil, soy sauce and vinegar. Well over 2,000 years ago Chinese tea was starting to be used for medicinal purposes as well. Green tea is the most popular type of tea drunk nowadays.

Types

Chinese tea is generally classified into five distinct categories: white, green, oolong, black and post-fermented. Within these main categories there are as many as 1,000 varieties of individual teas. Some of the varieties are due to different strains of the Camillia plant. Some obtain their characteristics from local growing conditions. But the largest factor in the big variations comes from different methods used in tea processing after the leaves have been harvested.

White and green teas are heat-treated quickly after picking to prevent fermentation (oxidisation). Oolong teas are partially oxidised and black teas are completely oxidised.  Other differences occur due to differences in the processing stages.

Culture

In China tea is always served when guests come to visit. As an important medium of etiquette, tea plays a big role in Chinese relationships. Knowing good tea etiquette, being polite and showing respect when drinking tea in China will reflect your good self-cultivation and will also bring you the pleasantness from drinking tea.

In restaurants it is common for diners to clean their bowls and utensils at the table by rinsing them with tea from the pot.

Brewing

The type of tea used influences the kind of infusing vessel, quantity of tea used and brewing times.

Water quality is crucial for making the best brew. Spring water from the same location that the tea is grown is best, but this is usually not practical or obtainable. Normally you can use any freshly drawn filtered water. Do not over-boil the water as this can taste flat. A pH of just over 7 is ideal. Different teas need different water temperatures to fully release their flavours. White and Green teas need to be brewed with cooler water (70-80°C). Oolong, Black and Puerh teas should be brewed at higher temperatures.

The Chinese use this ranking for water temperatures based on the size and appearance of the bubbles in the water:

Shrimp eyes - 70-80°C
Crab eyes - 80-85°C
Fish eyes - 85-90°C
Rope of Pearls - 90-95°C
Raging torrent - 95° - 100°C
Old man water - 100°C (over-boiled, ‘flat’ water)

Tea can be brewed in a cup or glass; Gaiwan (a type of lidded cup), an infuser or a Yixing (glass or ceramic teapot). Concerning length and number of infusions, some Green and Black teas can be infused slowly in a cup, and refilled with water when needed. Others, especially good Oolongs and Puerhs, require repeated quick infusions. The proportion of tea to water depends on persoanl taste, but usually not much tea is required for a satisfying brew.

Here is a quick guide to brewing different types:

White Tea: The Chinese are most likely to use a small ceramic teapot or Gaiwan.
Green Tea: A few strands in a tall glass is normal in China, topping up regularly with cool water. Alternatively use a Gaiwan or a teapot.
Jasmine Tea: Jasmine can have an intense flavour so best to go sparingly.
Oolong Tea: Some greener Oolongs such as Iron Buddha (Tie Guan Yin) can be brewed very successfully in a cup. Others, especially Dan Congs, need careful handling and brewing in a Gaiwan in a series of rapid infusions to bring out the full flavour.
Black Tea: Easy to brew, as they will stand a variety of water temperatures but most like it hot. Using s small teapot, infuser or Gaiwan is the best here.
Puerh Tea: A small teapot, preferably a Yixing (Zi Sha) clay pot, is considered essential. The clay of the Yixing takes on the flavour of the tea and adds its own character to the infusions over time. A high proportion of tea to water, boiling water and a series of very short infusions are recommended.